Happy Easter - hridayakamalam - 3

jkmrao's picture

We are all aware of the eight cornered hridayakamalam and assume that it is the
only way of drawing the hridayakamalam. Here is a hridayakamalam drawn with eighteen
corners. It is like a flower. The connections are made for hearts rotated by 140
degrees. Eggs are a must for easter symbolising new life. Hearts too symbolise
new life, is it not?

Regards! - mOhana

Rangoli: Happy Easter - hridayakamalam - 3

Comments

Lata's picture

Thank you and a happy Easter to you too.

Speaking of new life, do you celebrate tamil new year? Living away from India for so long, I'm not sure if I should call whatever we do on such occasions a celebration (I meant that from my perspective in my household, it may be different in others' houses). In my observation and in whatever little experience I've had, I see ourselves as not south-indians, or indian americans, but global people who may follow some rituals/traditions for special occasions. Or is it just adapting in different ways? For me, here is a difference I've noticed in our's/friends' household; we tend to cook fresh food (few varieties, not like how moms made), and don't rely on refrigerated/frozen-left-over food! And, a very simple puja (sometimes and not always). Everything is indoors, the minute you step out of the house, there are no signs of the "special occasion".

Coming back to the question; can my description of the special occasion be called a celebration at all? I don't think so, and am looking for a one-word term to substitute for it.

jkmrao's picture

While in India and even here for a few years we used to celebrate the
festivals. However, nowadays we infrequently do that. The children
too are gone and even when they were at home, they weren't very much
interested. They are not religious. For that matter, I too am not.
My religion is more cultural. Any way most of the festivals fall on
weekdays Wink I celebrate the events mentally! Reading and knowing is
my religion. As far as new year is concerned, it is really interesting
that different cultures follow different traditions, all relating to
the motions of the sun and the moon. Of course in India, it is the solar
new year that is followed more widely (baiSAkhi in the north). Interestingly,
vaiSAkha is the "first" month and chaitra is the "last" month even during
kAlidAsa's period!

Regards! - mOhana

jkmrao's picture

No it is not a celebration, it is an observance.

Regards! - mOhana

jayamohan's picture

Interesting question! Some festivals are observed(as put rightly bu Judy) and some celebrated! Pooja at home is a part of discipline and focus which can be simple or elaborate as per convenience! As and when one matures he may not concentrate on poojas but focus himself more towards meditation, reading and thinking.
Observance and celebrations are integral part of life! We can follow good things from any religion. For ex. 'Vishu Kani' of Kerala ia a positive aspect of 'seeing' auspicious things like Rice, dhal, fruits, coins etc.,on the first day of the New Year and seek blessings from elders with an one-rupee coin namely 'kai-neettam'. It is a fun watching children stretching hands even to their elder brothers and sisters for a good collection! 'Pocket money' culture varradukku munnadi idhu!